Daily Archives: August 21, 2013

Jeremiah Kipp’s Short Films

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Recently, I was fortunate enough to have a conversation with filmmaker Jeremiah Kipp. You might be familiar with Kipp’s work and not even know it. Having lent his expertise to such films as “I Sell the Dead” and “Somewhere Tonight,” in addition to having directed a plethora of critically acclaimed short films. Kipp is no stranger to the big screen and is currently completing his first-full length feature behind the camera entitled “The Sadist.” Kipp is well-known for his strict attention to structural detail, staggering visuals, and his ability to work extremely well with his actors. Speaking of which, Kipp has worked with tons of high-profile talent such as Ron Perlman, Dominic Monaghan, John Turturro, and Melissa Leo to name a few. Having several of his films screened at numerous festivals, including Cannes, and receiving rave reviews for his short film “The Christmas Party,” Kipp is one of the few directors to watch out for.

You can check out Jeremiah’s website here and his IMDB page here.

Now, Jeremiah has been gracious enough to provide me with several of his short films for my viewing pleasure. So, in my way of returning his generousity, below you will find my brief thoughts on these short, yet vastly entertaining vignettes.

Contact: 8 out of 10.

This Tense, unflinching, and brutal short, shot completely in black and white, is sure to catch you off guard. Right from the start, a wave of incessant uneasiness leaves a feeling of breathlessness and utter stillness. Eventually winding its way to a parallel tangent, “Contact” begins to unravel into a grim, decidedly honest story of addiction. Dotted with some violent gore and tasteful nudity, “Contact” isn’t merely appealing mentally and cinematically, but is also visually stimulating. Kipp does a sublime job using the story’s exhaustive power to full effectiveness and although at times it might not always be easy to watch. If you can stick it out, “Contact” is a very rewarding short.

contact

The Days God Slept: 8.5 out of 10.

Hallucinogenic, disturbing, and thought-provoking. Kipp’s brilliant sense of direction keeps this complex short from straying too far from relevance and descending into chaos. Starring Lauren Fox, best known for her role in Darren Aronofsky’s “Pi,” containing a musical score written by Harry Manfredini, who you might know as the composer of the “Friday the 13th” soundtrack, and then toss in Kipp behind the camera, it’s easy to see that “The Days God Slept” is a hidden gem. While it might not be for everyone. If you’re looking for a superbly thought-out, intricate, and controversial experience, this might be for you. Sure to stir the pot and send you into an uneasiness that’s not easy to shake, give “The Days God Slept” a watch, but be forewarned, you’re in for a shock.

DGS-shh

Drool: 7.5 out of 10.

At first glance, “Drool” might appear a little bizarre and monotonous. And the reason for this overwhelming feeling of simplicity and oddness is due to its intentional placement. With “Drool,” Kipp knows full well how to handle the apparent tediousness of this short’s premise and utilizes it as a lulling agent, then occasionally striking when the viewer is most vulnerable. Although it is not Kipp’s strongest short, the argument could be made that “Drool” holds more insight and underlying themes than some full-length features. Again, shot entirely in black and white. “Drool” offers a lot of the same shadiness and bleakness as Kipp’s other short, “Contact.” That being said, its distinguishability is unprecedented and is a must see for anyone looking to discover something out of the ordinary.

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If you feel like checking out any of Jeremiah Kipp’s films, head over to his website (linked above) for information or links on how and where to watch. I’d like to thank Jeremiah for allowing me to watch and review a few films from his repertoire. Look him up, you won’t be disappointed.