Monthly Archives: February 2014

86th Academy Awards: Nominations, Predictions, and Winners

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I know I’m a bit late posting my predictions for this year’s Academy Awards, but, if I’m to be honest, it was a difficult task to complete. It may sound easy enough, just selecting a favourite from a pre-determined list of eligible candidates, but I can assure it was much more complicated. There are a lot of worthy films, directors, writers, actors, etc…this time around, plus one needs to take into consideration the opinions and conclusions of those actually selecting the winners, and of course, I am not without bias, so there’s a lot to consider when compiling one’s predictions. This time, for the most part, I decided to follow my heart. On the other hand, there are undeniably frontrunners, so I adjusted accordingly. Below you’ll find the full list of nominations with my predictions beside the corresponding nominee, please enjoy!

BEST MOTION PICTURE OF THE YEAR:

American Hustle

Charles Roven, Richard Suckle, Megan Ellison and Jonathan Gordon.

Captain Phillips

Scott Rudin, Dana Brunetti and Michael De Luca.

Dallas Buyers Club

Robbie Brenner and Rachel Winter.

Gravity

Alfonso Cuarón and David Heyman.

Her

Megan Ellison, Spike Jonze and Vincent Landay.

Nebraska

Albert Berger and Ron Yerxa.

Philomena

Gabrielle Tana, Steve Coogan and Tracey Seaward.

12 Years A Slave (Prediction, Winner)

Brad Pitt, Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Steve McQueen and Anthony Katagas.

The Wolf Of Wall Street

Martin Scorsese, Leonardo DiCaprio, Joey McFarland and Emma Tillinger Koskoff.

 

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE:

Barkhad Abdi

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

Bradley Cooper

AMERICAN HUSTLE

Michael Fassbender (Prediction)

12 YEARS A SLAVE

Jonah Hill

THE WOLF OF WALL STREET

Jared Leto (Winner)

DALLAS BUYERS CLUB

 

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE:

Sally Hawkins

BLUE JASMINE

Jennifer Lawrence

AMERICAN HUSTLE

Lupita Nyong’o (Prediction, Winner)

12 YEARS A SLAVE

Julia Roberts

AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY

June Squibb

NEBRASKA

 

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE:

Christian Bale

AMERICAN HUSTLE

Bruce Dern

NEBRASKA

Leonardo DiCaprio (Prediction)

THE WOLF OF WALL STREET

Chiwetel Ejiofor

12 YEARS A SLAVE

Matthew McConaughey (Winner)

DALLAS BUYERS CLUB

 

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE:

Amy Adams

AMERICAN HUSTLE

Cate Blanchett (Winner)

BLUE JASMINE

Sandra Bullock (Prediction)

GRAVITY

Judi Dench

PHILOMENA

Meryl Streep

AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY

 

BEST ANIMATED FILM OF THE YEAR:

THE CROODS

Chris Sanders, Kirk DeMicco and Kristine Belson

DESPICABLE ME 2

Chris Renaud, Pierre Coffin and Chris Meledandri

ERNEST & CELESTINE

Benjamin Renner and Didier Brunner

FROZEN (Winner)

Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee and Peter Del Vecho

THE WIND RISES (Prediction)

Hayao Miyazaki and Toshio Suzuki

 

ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY:

THE GRANDMASTER

Philippe Le Sourd

GRAVITY (Prediction, Winner)

Emmanuel Lubezki

INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS

Bruno Delbonnel

Nebraska

Phedon Papamichael

PRISONERS

Roger A. Deakins

 

ACHIEVEMENT IN COSTUME DESIGN:

AMERICAN HUSTLE

Michael Wilkinson

THE GRANDMASTER

William Chang Suk Ping

THE GREAT GATSBY

Catherine Martin (Winner)

THE INVISIBLE WOMAN

Michael O’Connor

12 YEARS A SLAVE

Patricia Norris (Prediction)

 

ACHIEVEMENT IN DIRECTING:

AMERICAN HUSTLE

David O. Russell

GRAVITY

Alfonso Cuarón (Prediction, Winner)

NEBRASKA

Alexander Payne

12 YEARS A SLAVE

Steve McQueen

THE WOLF OF WALL STREET

Martin Scorsese

 

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE:

THE ACT OF KILLING (Prediction)

Joshua Oppenheimer and Signe Byrge Sørensen

CUTIE AND THE BOXER

Zachary Heinzerling and Lydia Dean Pilcher

DIRTY WARS

Richard Rowley and Jeremy Scahill

THE SQUARE

Jehane Noujaim and Karim Amer

20 FEET FROM STARDOM (Winner)

Morgan Neville, Gil Friesen and Caitrin Rogers

 

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT:

CAVEDIGGER

Jeffrey Karoff

FACING FEAR

Jason Cohen

KARAMA HAS NO WALLS

Sara Ishaq

THE LADY IN NUMBER 6: MUSIC SAVED MY LIFE (Prediction, Winner)

Malcolm Clarke and Nicholas Reed

PRISON TERMINAL: THE LAST DAYS OF PRIVATE JACK HALL

Edgar Barens

 

ACHIEVEMENT IN FILM EDITING:

AMERICAN HUSTLE

Jay Cassidy, Crispin Struthers and Alan Baumgarten

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

Christopher Rouse

DALLAS BUYERS CLUB

John Mac McMurphy and Martin Pensa

GRAVITY

Alfonso Cuarón and Mark Sanger (Prediction, Winner)

12 YEARS A SLAVE

Joe Walker

 

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM OF THE YEAR:

THE BROKEN CIRCLE BRE AKDOWN

Belgium

THE GREAT BEAUTY (Winner)

Italy

THE HUNT (Prediction)

Denmark

THE MISSING PICTURE

Cambodia

OMAR

Palestine

 

ACHIEVEMENT IN MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING:

DALLAS BUYERS CLUB

Adruitha Lee and Robin Mathews (Prediction, Winner)

JACKASS PRESENTS : BAD GRANDPA

Stephen Prouty

THE LONE RANGER

Joel Harlow and Gloria Pasqua-Casny

 

ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC WRITTEN FOR MOTION PICTURES (Original Score):

THE BOOK THIEF

John Williams

GRAVITY

Steven Price (Prediction, Winner)

HER

William Butler and Owen Pallett

PHILOMENA

Alexandre Desplat

SAVING MR. BANKS

Thomas Newman

 

ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC WRITTEN FOR MOTION PICTURES (Original Song):

Happy

DESPICABLE ME 2

Music and Lyrics by Pharrell Williams

Let It Go (Winner)

FROZEN

Music and Lyrics by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez

The Moon Song (Prediction)

HER

Music by Karen O Lyrics by Karen O and Spike Jonze

Ordinary Love

MANDELA: LONG WALK TO FREEDOM

Music by Paul Hewson, Dave Evans, Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen Lyrics by Paul Hewson

 

ACHIEVEMENT IN PRODUCTION DESIGN:

AMERICAN HUSTLE (Prediction)

Production Design: Judy Becker

Set Decoration: Heather Loeffler

GRAVITY

Production Design: Andy Nicholson

Set Decoration: Rosie Goodwin and Joanne Woollard

THE GREAT GATSBY (Winner)

Production Design: Catherine Martin

Set Decoration: Beverley Dunn

HER

Production Design: K.K. Barrett

Set Decoration: Gene Serdena

12 YEARS A SLAVE

Production Design: Adam Stockhausen

Set Decoration: Alice Baker

 

BEST ANIMATED SHORT FILM:

FERAL

Daniel Sousa and Dan Golden

GET A HORSE!

Lauren MacMullan and Dorothy McKim

MR. HUBLOT (Prediction, Winner)

Laurent Witz and Alexandre Espigares

POSSESSIONS

Shuhei Morita

ROOM ON THE BROOM

Max Lang and Jan Lachauer

 

BEST LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM:

AQUEL NO ERA YO (THAT WASN’T ME)

Esteban Crespo

AVANT QUE DE TOUT PERDRE (JUST BEFORE LOSING EVERYTHING)

Xavier Legrand and Alexandre Gavras

HELIUM (Winner)

Anders Walter and Kim Magnusson

PITÄÄKÖ MUN KAIKKI HOITAA? (DO I HAVE TO TAKE CARE OF EVERYTHING?)

Selma Vilhunen and Kirsikka Saari

THE VOORMAN PROBLEM (Prediction)

Mark Gill and Baldwin Li

 

ACHIEVEMENT IN VISUAL EFFECTS:

GRAVITY (Prediction, Winner)

Tim Webber, Chris Lawrence, Dave Shirk and Neil Corbould

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG

Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton and Eric Reynolds

IRON MAN 3

Christopher Townsend, Guy Williams, Erik Nash and Dan Sudick

THE LONE RANGER

Tim Alexander, Gary Brozenich, Edson Williams and John Frazier

STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS

Roger Guyett, Patrick Tubach, Ben Grossmann and Burt Dalton

 

ACHIEVEMENT IN SOUND EDITING:

ALL IS LOST

Steve Boeddeker and Richard Hymns

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

Oliver Tarney

GRAVITY (Prediction, Winner)

Glenn Freemantle

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG

Brent Burge

LONE SURVIVOR

Wylie Stateman

 

ACHIEVEMENT IN SOUND MIXING:

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

Chris Burdon, Mark Taylor, Mike Prestwood Smith and Chris Munro

GRAVITY (Winner)

Skip Lievsay, Niv Adiri, Christopher Benstead and Chris Munro

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG

Christopher Boyes, Michael Hedges, Michael Semanick and Tony Johnson

INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS (Prediction)

Skip Lievsay, Greg Orloff and Peter F. Kurland

LONE SURVIVOR

Andy Koyama, Beau Borders and David Brownlow

 

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY:

BEFORE MIDNIGHT

Written by Richard Linklater, Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

Screenplay by Billy Ray

PHILOMENA

Screenplay by Steve Coogan and Jeff Pope

12 YEARS A SLAVE (Winner)

Screenplay by John Ridley

THE WOLF OF WALL STREET (Prediction)

Screenplay by Terence Winter

 

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY:

AMERICAN HUSTLE

Written by Eric Warren Singer and David O. Russell

BLUE JASMINE

Written by Woody Allen

DALLAS BUYERS CLUB

Written by Craig Borten & Melisa Wallack

HER (Prediction, Winner)

Written by Spike Jonze

NEBRASKA

Written by Bob Nelson

All is Lost (2013)

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What can a movie be, exactly? A ridiculous question to most, no doubt. But let’s put ridiculousness aside for a moment and ponder it. When you think about it, a film can be anything you want it to be…obviously. Any film is subsequent to the viewer, his/her experiences, upbringing, and environment. It can be as simple or as complex as you, the viewer, see fit. Which, when you think about it, is quite possibly the most beautiful thing about cinema. Plainly put, each and every individual can draw an infinite amount of conclusions, reactions, and emotions from every film in existence. Why I bring this up has a lot to do with what I experienced watching “All is Lost” starring Robert Redford.

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Imagine a movie without dialogue, without supporting characters, set within a sinking boat floating helplessly with the current, tussling with the waves on the Indian ocean and the wrath of Mother Nature. This vessel carries a man, who’s endlessly searching, hoping for rescue, food, and clean water. No history or preconceived notions to speak of, the conclusions made are left entirely to the viewer, derived from nothing but a series of visuals. One being fighting against nature with only the elements to survive.

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It’s as simple as that. This is J. C. Chandor’s “All is Lost.” A film that doesn’t imply upon the viewer, but rather let’s the audience infer and compile their own deductions. Director Chandor merely acts as a transitioning agent, a depicter that forces those witnessing his work to morph and shift what he’s given you into a story that has become derivative of who and what you are. Essentially, Chandor and lead actor, well, the only performer Robert Redford, make you sort of an alchemist. Which results in one of the most immersive, unique, personal cinematic experiences you will ever have. Conversely, this makes the critics job all the more difficult, seeing as each viewer of “All is Lost” likely concludes and experiences something totally unknown to every other viewer.

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Granted, these differences are minuscule and the central story remains essentially intact and universal for all, but the tiny differences are what truly allow “All is Lost” to become transcendent. It’s this social, nurturing, political characteristics. It’s like the difference between an explosion and an implosion. You wouldn’t be able to spot the subtle inconsistencies from a distance, but when you search past superficiality, there’s an entire world of underlying meanings, familiar traits, and contrast.

Cinematically, “All is Lost” is without question something to marvel. Had “Gravity” not come along and completely put each and every other cinematographers work to shame, “All is Lost” would easily have left audiences equally as breathless. The scenery, atmosphere, and overall tone of the film is sombrely beautiful. One can’t help but gaze in amazement at the wonders of our planet, sky, ocean, technology, and humanity. This is all thanks to director and writer J. C. Chandor. Additionally, Alex Ebert’s melancholic, epic score really completes Chandor’s visuals and masterful tale. It has already picked up the Golden Globe for best score.

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More important than these facets is that Robert Redford hasn’t been this masterful in a good, long while. “All is Lost” sees a return to form for the illustrious actor and I wouldn’t deny that his performance here might be one of, if not the best of his career. Speaking no more than a few words throughout the film’s entirety, Redford still manages to control the screen with an unwavering intensity, heart-shattering vulnerability, and compassionate brilliance. The amount of sympathy one feels toward this wayward sailor knows no bounds. You feel as if you’re right there in the sinking ship with him as all hope and fight begins to drown.

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“All is Lost” features one of the best musical accompaniments, performances, and overall experiences of the year. Making it easily one of the best films 2013 has to offer.

All is Lost: 9 out of 10.

Only Lovers Left Alive (2014)

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Director and writer Jim Jarmusch’s “Only Lovers Left Alive” is a peculiar film regarding vampirism. And, as it most commonly is when submitting oneself to a piece from Jarmusch’s body of work, it’s a tough beast to tame. It tackles all the vampiric themes one would expect, undying love, an unquenchable thirst for healthy vitals, eternal existence, and so on. Yet, it’s the fresh, atypical, achromatic reality he brings to the sub-genre that sets “Only Lovers Left Alive” apart from the pack. Jarmusch manages to create and capture these blood-sucker trademarks with such a genuine, almost non-fictional authenticity that the ideal of a vampire transcends the fantastical realm into our own.

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“Only Lovers Left Alive” is subtle, self-referential, inter-textual, allusive, and most importantly, intelligent. Exploding with an entrancing musical score, gloomy visuals, and an engulfing atmosphere. But perhaps what’s most surprising is the dark, sly, morbid sense of humour present throughout the film’s runtime. For example, our anti-hero consistently likens the general human population to “zombies” and our species technological advances have never seemed so insignificant. Caught somewhere between the complexity of electricity and the emergence of the smartphone, there’s no shortage of witty jabs at our futuristic gadgets and their controlling, outdated prowess.

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Not stopping at our achievements, “Only Lovers Left Alive” continues to shine a harsh light on humankind’s shortcomings. With the persistent bashing of our kinds stupidity for dismissing and cutting those down who propel us forward, those who think differently…like scientists, musicians, and philosophers…humanities faults are never far from prominent here. We’ve even managed to contaminate our own blood, which doesn’t sit well with those who bare fangs, as it poisons them, leading to an arduously slow, painful death. Forcing those who want to stay healthy into obtaining uncontaminated blood from a secure, reliable source, which is always risky. There’s symbolism oozing from Jarmusch’s latest, one must only look.

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I can see how being alive for centuries, watching mankind progress at a crawl, might be frustrating. Hell, I can barely stand where we are currently or even look at where we’re heading without buckling…but I digress. There’s a beautiful theory, apart from Einstein’s Theory of Entanglement in “Only Lovers Left Alive,” comparing blood and water as the basis for all life and sustenance, a kind of eternal currency, that’s absolutely transcendent. Make sure to gather all the pieces scattered throughout the dialogue to form the thesis when watching.

“Only Lovers Left Alive” has so much to offer, it needn’t be carried by its two leads, Tom Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton. Nevertheless, both Tom and Tilda can’t help but put the film on their backs. Hiddleston as Adam, a modern rock god, mopping around a gloomy apartment, suicidal, experimenting, and helplessly in love. Swinton as Eve, sniffing about for fresh sustenance, full of wisdom and love, “ruthless, brutal” as Hiddleston’s Adam claims in the film. Both look so lovely, calm, but underneath storms brew and an evil dormant. Hiddleston, who continues his rapid ascent to the mainstream, is nothing short of marvellous and Swinton matches her co-star stride for stride. Never faltering under the obscurity, complexity, and weight of “Only Lovers Left Alive,” Swinton and Hiddleston run the show.

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Mia Wasikowska, Anton Yelchin, Jeffery Wright, and William Hurt round out the cast and provide a much needed chaotic, grounded, human element to their cold-blooded, nocturnal co-stars and the film as a whole. Apart from Wasikowska, the supporting staff doesn’t garner much screen time, yet fulfill their limited duties with a very predictable capability. There’s a fear radiating from the supporting ensemble that the viewer can sympathize with, a need to tread lightly when in the company of these mysterious, stoic beings, which we can abide by. They’re never out of place or speak unless spoken to. Their performances are hypnotic, fragile, terrified.

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Not simply a story with characters and structure, rather, Jim Jarmusch’s “Only Lovers Left Alive” has a point to make. Its unnerving, smart, haunting, and beautiful, a toxic cocktail that tastes too good to put down.

Only Lovers Left Alive: 8.5 out of 10.

Most Anticipated Films of 2014: Poll Results

If you recall, a little while back I asked you to vote for the 3 films that you were most looking forward to in 2014. So, for the next couple of weeks, the poll has been collecting data and the response, much like the inception poll of ‘Vote!,’ has been tremendous. Now, I appear before you with the results! However, before I get to them, I’d like to inform you all that the latest poll will be up and ready for your votes early next week, so look forward to that.

Also, I am now accepting submissions for ‘Mystery Article of the Week!’ It can be anything you’ve written, new and old, about whatever you see fit. Of course, we cinephiles would prefer the article to be about film, but it’s not a requirement. Additionally, I need some new “Guest List” submissions, so please don’t hesitate! Compile those lists and send them to me. You can send all articles and top 10 lists to thecinemamonster@gmail.com…

As you can probably guess, much like the last poll, the percentages are a tad low. That being said, when considering the sheer number of films that received a vote, the minuscule number beside each film below isn’t all that concerning. So, without further delay, let’s get to the results!

 

INTERSTELLAR (CHRISTOPHER NOLAN): 15%

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GODZILLA (GARETH EDWARDS): 9%

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X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST (BRYAN SINGER): 8%

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CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (ANTHONY RUSSO & JOE RUSSO): 8%

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HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2 (DEAN DeBOIS): 5%

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THE HOBBIT: THERE AND BACK AGAIN (PETER JACKSON): 4%

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THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (WES ANDERSON) 4%

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TRANSCENDENCE (WALLY PFISTER): 3%

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NYMPHOMANIAC: VOLUME I & II (LARS VON TRIER) 3%

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GONE GIRL (DAVID FINCHER): 3%

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Dallas Buyers Club (2013)

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I’ve heard a few claim that actors, such as Christian Bale for “The Fighter”, only won an Oscar or other accolades simply due to the sheer amount of weight they either lost or gained for the corresponding role. That their achievement was merely bestowed upon them for such radical weight shifts and was not the result of towering talent and investment. Of course, this topic has come up more often recently due to award season buzz surrounding the aforementioned Christian Bale, who once again changed his weight for the film “American Hustle” and skyrocketing star Matthew McConaughey, who lost a dangerous amount of weight for his film “Dallas Buyers Club.” Is it a coincidence that these two actors are at the centre of most award season rumours and predictions? Or is there merit in changing oneself physically as well as mentally for a role that demands it? What do you think?

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I feel that this statement, regarding the cohesiveness of recognition and weight modifications, which may or may not resonate with each of you, is completely and utterly false, no matter which way you swing it. Even if one was recognized or given an award for a role in which they endured a significant weight change, it takes an incredible amount of balance, self-restrain, and discipline to pull of such fluctuations, and the recipient, in my opinion, is very much deserving of the praise, maybe even an award. I mean, it’s not as if this type of endeavour is a walk in the park, regardless if you’re gaining or losing excessive pounds. I think it’s important for actors to throw themselves entirely into their characters, and if significant physical alterations is what needs to be done in order to achieve total and believable portrayals, so be it.

That being said, of course I think that there is more to garnering universal acclaim in the film industry than mere weight transitions. One can lose all the weight they please, but like a performance that requires no physical changes, if the facial expressions, emotion, authenticity, rawness, talent, and honesty isn’t there, the performance is moot. Keep in mind however, that rising and falling numbers on a scale do contribute significantly to a characters appearance, obviously, as well as the mental stability and impression the character’s surrounding environment has on him/her. It can enhance the viewer’s experience to an uncomfortable, realistic extent and increase the range of an actors talents. Weight fluctuation is a skill, a tool utilized by actors to accomplish their job as impressively, thoroughly as possible.

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PLOT:

Based on the real story of Ron Woodruff, “Dallas Buyers Club” centres around Mr. Woodruff, an electrician who doubles as a hustler and who is your stereotypical redneck, racist and homophobic. When he isn’t at work however, Ron partakes in a lifestyle consisting of frequent, unprotected sex and drug use. Upon waking up in a hospital after a work-related injury, he is informed that he is HIV positive. Fearing the worst, Ron quickly finds an illegal way to obtain the most recent, potent drug to assist in his recovery and stabilization. Soon, Ron comes to terms with the fact that the drug is destroying his body and other patients systems as well. And with the assistance of a foreign doctor, companies abroad, and a few locals, Ron starts the Dallas Buyers Club. A membership-driven organization that distributes unapproved remedies that work safely and effectively to those suffering from AIDS. Of course, illegal activity cannot go unnoticed and unpunished, and it’s not long before those not benefiting from this secret operation take action.

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As I mentioned previously, Matthew McConaughey, the star of “Dallas Buyers Club,” lost a threatening amount of weight for his role as Ron Woodruff. He’s already earned the golden globe for his outstanding portrayal here and has been nominated for an Oscar as well. That should speak enough to the caliber of his performance here. It’s a risky character to undertake, but he’s done a stellar job capturing and exuding the fear, vulnerability, and courage of Ron Woodruff. McConaughey’s recent rapid ascension is unprecedented. Over the past couple of years, he’s shifted from rom-com playboy to Oscar heavyweight with outstanding outings in high-profile gigs such as the television series “True Detective” alongside Woody Harrelson and the film “The Wolf of Wall Street” directed by Martin Scorsese. You can catch McConaughey in another hotly-anticipated flick “Interstellar” directed by the illustrious Christopher Nolan set for release later this year. It’s looks prime to earn him more accolades and praise.

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Now, I know I might catch some flack for this next statement, nonetheless, it’s my honest opinion and needs to be said. Jared Leto, who has already earned a Golden Globe win like his co-star, did not impress me nearly as much as the performance’s reputation leads on. It’s a good portrayal, but nothing to get overly excited about. I respect and admire the heart and bravery needed for the role and Leto fulfilled it quite well, just not as sufficient and brilliant as McConaughey. Maybe Leto’s character was so over-shadowed by McConaughey’s Woodruff that it left me cold and indifferent. Regardless, it’s definitely a notch above most, but not Oscar worthy, again, in my opinion.

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“Dallas Buyers Club” is completely driven by its performances. The story is inspiring, riveting, and thought-provoking. Yet, apart from these facets, cinematically there isn’t a lot to marvel at. That being said, it does provide some of the most honest, harsh filmmaking of the year. All in all, “Dallas Buyers Club” is without question one of the best of 2013 and should be respected as such, despite what it obviously lacks.

Dallas Buyers Club: 8.5 out of 10.