Blog Archives

Top 10 Worst Cameos

_MG_3509.dng

Another week, another Top 10, and I couldn’t be more excited! As you probably realized from the article title, this week’s edition will contain 10 cameos I figured to be just plain awful. However, while I was compiling this list, I realized how exceedingly hard it was to find 10, utterly terrible cameos, so I expanded the criteria a bit. The cameos listed are not confined to just being terrible, they can be odd, bizarre, unnecessary, and so on, and so on. Essentially, anything that’s out of the ordinary. I was initially going to post the 10 best cameos I could think of, but came to the conclusion that one couldn’t exist without the other. So, instead of starting strong and finishing weak, I reversed the printing order. Next week’s top 10 will contain the best cameos, so, yeah, look forward to that!

And no, before you even ask, Mike Tyson’s cameo in “The Hangover” is not on this list. Until I am able to concoct a header image for this “Top 10” segment, I will continue to use random pictures that are in some way connected to the general theme.

I know that some of you may not agree with my choices or think that I overlooked a cameo that down-right ruined a movie for you. If this is the case, leave a comment below and I will address you personally, because I have nothing better to do ;).

Without further ado, let’s get started!

 

10: Bruce Willis in “Oceans 12.”

Why?: Don’t get me wrong, I absolutely love the “Oceans” trilogy. It’s just that this particular segment really annoys me. The whole Julia Roberts thing and meeting Bruce Willis and him being oblivious to the stars and situation around him, it just really bothers me.

500full

 

9: Thomas Lennon in “The Dark Knight Rises.”

Why?: Another film that I genuinely love through and through. I just feel that this is a cameo that Mr. Nolan should have let slip through the cracks. Regardless if it was casting or a legitimate attempt at a cameo, it is so bizarre and unnecessarily funny.

dkr-thomas-lennon

 

8: Quentin Tarantino in “Django Unchained.”

Why? Again, I absolutely love Mr. Tarantino and his films, yet, I can’t let this cameo slide. I know he likes to appear in his own films and I am fine with that. I thought his cameo in “Pulp Fiction” was hilarious, but “Django Unchained” is another story. The accent is atrocious and that entire sequence felt a bit off to me. I know I am going to catch hell for this.

quentin-tarantino-django-unchained

 

7: Matt Damon in “Finding Forrester.”

Why?: Reprising his role as Will Hunting, oh wait, does he? Anyway, the movies are so similar that Damon’s cameo really connects the two in an unpleasant way. This is as unnecessary a cameo as they come. Don’t worry, this list has more Matt Damon to come.

01082009_findingforrester

 

6: Arnold Schwarzenegger in “The Expendables.”

Why?: I know that Willis has a brief cameo as well, but didn’t feel like picking on him twice. I didn’t care for “The Expendables” and I see no reason to drag down another action star just for a brief chuckle.

Expendables Schwarzenegger

 

5: David Hasselhoff in “Piranha 3DD.”

Why?: Because I said so, that’s why. This is such an unnecessary film and I see no need to bring the “Hoff” into it.

piranha3dd4112012.3

 

4: Matt Damon in “Eurotrip.”

Why?: Yes, the movie is somewhat entertaining and the cameo may be funny as hell, but it is so weird and idiotic. A mega-star like Matt Damon doesn’t belong down in the gutter.

Picture 10

 

3: Stan Lee in, take your pick.

Why?: Yeah, it was cute and charming for a while, but it got real old, real fast for me.

500full-1

 

2: Macy Grey in “Spider Man.”

Why?: I don’t mind a good cameo, but it can’t date a film for eternity, if you know what I mean.

macy-gray-spider-man

 

1: M. Night Shyamalan in “Signs.”

Why?: I don’t think a career has ever gone so sour, so fast. This is as unnecessary a cameo as they come. Terrible acting and just plain weird. M. Night Shyamalan will be forever repeating to people “Hey, remember “The Sixth Sense?”

000M

 

If you’ve got beef with this top 10, be sure to let me know in the comment section below ;). Have a great weekend!

Advertisements

Top 10 Films of 2012

We might be a bit late to this particular list’s party, but better now than never. This was a difficult list to compile, lots of great pictures to chose from. But myself (monster1711) and my bud (cinema2033) think we’ve created a diverse and respectable list. If you feel that we overlooked a certain film or have any suggestions for future top 10’s, please comment below. Without further anticipation, let’s get started.

10. Looper. Easily the best science fiction film of the year. Featuring terrific performances from Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Bruce Willis, Looper is a brain scrambler that will leave you stunned.

looper1

9. The Cabin in the Woods. Speaking of brain scramblers. The Cabin in the Woods is definitely the most bizarre film of the year. Mixing the hilarious and terrifying elements of horror and poking fun at them, it is sure to be a cult favourite.

CabinintheWoods

8. Skyfall. Quite possibly the best Bond film to ever grace the big screen. Skyfall is witty, charming, and one hell of a ride. With towering performances from Daniel Craig and Javier Bardem, Skyfall is not to be missed.

skyfall-ceasefire-magazine

7. Seven Psychopaths. Another entry into Martin McDonagh’s violent comedies. Seven Psychopaths is full of violence, hilarity, and outstanding performances from Sam Rockwell and Christopher Walken.

seven-psychopaths-banner

6. Argo. Winner of the 2012 Oscar for best picture, need we say more? Directed and starring Ben Affleck, Argo is history come alive.

01_argo_iphone

5. Silver Linings Playbook. Thought by many to be the best picture of 2012. Silver Linings Playbook is another solid outing from David O. Russell and features a return to form for Robert De Niro. Not to mention the emergence of Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence as real acting heavyweights.

Silver-Linings-Playbook-poster

4. On The Road. Possibly the most controversial film on the list, On The Road left audiences divided. Based on Jack Kerouac’s generation defining novel. On The Road features entrancing performances from Sam Riley, Garrett Hedlund, and especially the lovely Kristen Stewart.

on-the-road-movie-poster1

3. Django Unchained. The second chapter in Tarantino’s yet to be finished history trilogy. Django Unchained landed Christoph Waltz another supporting actor Oscar. Also starring Jamie Foxx, Samuel L. Jackson, and a deliciously evil performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, Django Unchained is violently hilarious.

django-unchained-poster__span

2. Zero Dark Thirty. Best picture nominee Zero Dark Thirty is brought to you by the creators of The Hurt Locker. There really isn’t anything else that needs to be said. Incredibly tense, monumental performances, and impeccably scripted. Zero Dark Thirty is an unstoppable force.

zero-dark-thirty1

1. The Dark Knight Rises. The conclusion to the Dark Knight trilogy, directed by the brilliant Christopher Nolan. With Tom Hardy as Bane, The Dark Knight Rises has the best villain performance of the year. Including an unmatchable cast and an epic finale no one saw coming, The Dark Knight Rises might be the greatest comic book adapted film in the history of cinema.

The-Dark-Knight-Rises-Poster1

Honourable Mentions. Lincoln, Sightseers, Prometheus, The Avengers, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, End of Watch.

Looper (2012)

looper-sept27

To say that Looper is an ambitious, mind churning take on time travel and the future would be putting it lightly. Turning the duality of humanity, destiny, and our forthcoming evolution into a provocative, thought bending thriller. Looper, a modern feat, has all the right elements in the concoction that is science fiction. Rian Johnson, Looper’s writer and director transposes his literary idealism in supreme form to the big screen, a difficult task when two of the main characters are the same person. The integrity of the CGI fused into Looper never falters and neither does Johnson’s Cast. Comprised of Bruce Willis, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, and Emily Blunt, Looper’s accomplished actors fulfill Johnson’s visions and demonstrate our impending fortunes or possibly our perils.

In the year 2074, time travel exists but is forbidden. However, when criminal organizations get hold of time travel machines, they send people they want killed back in time to be taken out by “loopers.” Loopers are hired by the organizations thirty years in the past and are ordered to kill whoever is sent back and get rid of the body. When the mob decides to terminate a contract with anyone of their killers, they send him back in time to be killed by himself and this closes the loop. In 2044, Joe (Levitt) is a contract killer who’s loop is sent back to be closed. When old Joe (Willis) returns to the past, young Joe is unable to take him out. Learning of his life, a ruthless leader named Rainmaker, and the possibility to change the future, young Joe also becomes entangled with a woman named Sara (Blunt). In order to save his life and do right by the people he cares about, Joe is filled with difficult decisions that need to be made.

Joseph-Gordon-Levitt-as-Young-Joe-in-Looper1

With its twists and catchy action sequences, Looper is a sci-fi obsessors dream. However, while it may be encased in a genre, Looper has its fair share of surprising personal conundrums and political indecisions. Looper may deal with time travel, but the use for it isn’t typical of your usual dime a dozen, brain dead science fiction pictures.  The ripples caused by its usage severely impacts our existence and disintegrates what we may have become accustom to. Essentially, the battle between good and evil rages on in Looper with a much more plausible function. Willis and Levitt are terrific in their roles of the same character caught at different times and at opposite ends of the moral line. Levitt is barely recognizable except for his superb acting prowess and Willis hasn’t been this effective in years. Blunt is graceful and nurturing in her role that is based heavily on the argument of nature vs nurture. Johnson’s Looper is glorifying and incredibly significant in these times and gives a unique insight into our lives and everyday decisions.

Looper: 8.5 out of 10.